Archives for category: 2020

Three months into quarantine — lockdown — shelter-at-home — whatever you call it — and we’re still not able to meet as a group. No one in NYC is. But somehow life is still going on. Yesterday was Memorial Day, and Central Park was full of families sharing a picnic blanket at least six feet away from the next family or walking the paths, masked. And people who love to be topless are finding ways to be topless, whether that means finding a quiet clearing in the park–

Or leaving the city for a wilder terrain–

Or getting rid of their shirt while driving–

Or on the roof–

Or the back porch–

Or an empty stretch of beach —

Or just in the privacy of their own home.

Meanwhile, some of our members embrace online challenges like reproducing famous works of art, or invent provocative new images of their own.

It passes the time. But we hope it’s not too much longer before the situation improves and we can meet with our friends again! Safely, carefully, but together rather than alone. June may not be the month for it, we realize. Nobody knows what month it’ll be. But it’ll be some month, and hopefully some month soon, while the temperature is warm enough to pull down our swimsuits and wear nothing but sunscreen.

It’ll come. We promise: we’ll be back.

As we write this, on May 1, 2020, we’re 7 weeks into a global lockdown. Quarantine. Call it what you will. This wasn’t the way the year was supposed to go. It was supposed to get warmer, winter was supposed to give way to spring, buds were going to start peeking out from tree branches and nipples from under shirts. Life was going to start again.

We got a little foretaste of it on March 9 — a preview of the spring on a day when, improbably, the sun came out and the temperature soared into the 70s.

It seemed like all of New York City came out into the streets and parks to breathe deep of the suddenly temperate air. There must have been a few thousand people in Washington Square Park, seated side by side on the grass, still damp and slightly muddy from the previous night’s rain.

The feeling in the air was one of amity and comity, of tolerance and openness, of warmth of every kind.

So when our group’s eager members gathered on the lawn, first in a tight little group–

–and then in a sprawling one numbering 20 or more, no one gave us a second look (much less a hostile one). No one told us to put our tops back on or bothered us in any way.

And we in turn were tolerant when approached by neighborhood characters like the Free Hugs man.

Who doesn’t want a hug sometimes?

Some of our long-time members showed up, eager to throw off the shackles of winter hibernation.

And some first-timers joined us too, taking a long, late lunch from office jobs or playing hooky from their last classes of the day.

How could office work or homework compete with a chance to feel the sun on your skin?

We took these photos 54 days ago and have been holding onto them ever since. When we took them, we had no idea that this would be our one and only event for the next two months — or three months or six months or maybe all year. Who could possibly have imagined what was coming just a few days later?

We almost didn’t want to post them — as if by holding them back, we were keeping a little bit of that day alive, as if we could avoid facing the fact that our larder is now empty: no more photos waiting to be posted, no more events to tell you about.

Oh, we’re still optimistic that things will get better before the summer comes and goes. But even if they do — even if a small set of us cautiously decides to gather in the warmth of June or July or August, sitting 6 feet apart from one another in some quiet corner of Central Park — it won’t be the same. Not thousands of people sharing a lawn and a beautiful day, careless and free, without masks, without fear, without the specter of sickness and death. Freedom is still important, and so is equality, and we’ll continue to fight for both. But it’ll be a while before anyone will feel easy and comfortable again.

It’s a new world, and we will learn how to navigate it. But for now, we share with you this moment of bliss, this moment Before.

We’re glad so many of you were able to share it with us in person, and we’re glad so many more of you will share it with us now in memory.

As quarantine conditions stretch on into their second month — and surely not their last — we continue to find new ways to spend our time indoors, and the limited amount of time we get to spend outdoors.

In NYC, orders say you must cover your face before you go out if you can’t be sure social distancing — a 6-foot separation between people — will be possible.

But a few of us (not the ones in NYC!) are fortunate enough to be near a beach where a private spot by the water can be found.

And some are sheltering in other remote locations, where the biggest worry isn’t encountering another human being, it’s getting mowed down by the 6:43 Acela.

Some of us live in neighborhoods where a fenced yard provides a bit of fresh air, and enough privacy to dress the way we want without passersby sharing their opinions.

And some of us are maintaining our workout regimens, even if spotters at the gym are a thing of the past.

But for many of us, our lives have moved indoors for the foreseeable future.

We enjoy our morning coffee without worrying about getting dressed.

We savor the sunlight through our double-pane window glass.

We get halfway ready to go out, and then don’t.

And we kill time. We kill it honing our Photoshop skillz —

–or practicing with the timer on our camera–

–or, you know, just get back into bed and make the world go away for a little bit.

And we think about other people, the ones whose lives have been upended completely, who’ve lost loved ones or livelihoods. One of our friends posted this image on Instagram–

–with links to a whole bunch of fellow Instagrammers she asked her followers to support: @whoregasmic, @devorahreine, @brittaxgraves, @thee.mystic.alien, @missgigirope, @luxefatale, @mxmayaodelle, @ten.against, @notcamdamage, @stripperfolkart, @_bigbootysadgirl, @mistress_ashleypaige, @aubreerene_, @ prom__queef, @switchavanyc, @koi_erotica, @fern_fatale, @whoisbobbylabottom, @kaijafaerie, @thepainproofpriestess.

You have your own list, surely, not just of online acquaintances but friends and family; and we hope everyone on it is getting the love and attention and care they deserve. We hope you are too. Take care of yourself. Stay healthy — or get healthy. And please join us in wishing for the soonest and safest end to this terrible situation.

We’ll see you out in the sun again soon. (Even if not soon enough.)

Life in New York has changed — life everywhere has changed.

The rules have changed: no gatherings of more than 10 people; no “non-essential” gatherings of more than 2 people; no gatherings, period. No going outside for anything but buying food or medicine or to see a doctor or for a bit of daily exercise. No going within six feet of another human being.

But the people of New York haven’t changed, the people in our group haven’t changed, and the laws that state that women in New York have all the same freedoms as men haven’t changed — meaning that whatever limited freedom we are allowed, we can use it topless if we want. And we do want. Every little taste of freedom matters, even more so at a time like this.

So we asked our members to share selfies with us, showing how they’re spending their quarantine hours, whether that’s the limited time we’re allowed out or the endless hours we’re spending in — and whether they’re in New York or not. Our members are spread all over the world at this point, and for once this is an event everyone can take part in.

So where do we go when we need to feel the touch of sun and air on our skin? In the limited time we’re allowed, we go out to the park or the forest or the riverbank.

Or just the nearest grassy lawn, together with our canine companion and the most unsentimental book ever written.

We get topless on the deck outside our house, if there is one,

Or up on the roof,

Or out on the fire escape.

Or, if we must, we get our sun through our windows.

What, you thought we’d wear tops when we’re stuck at home? Whether it’s “remote learning” or “working from home,” the only thing we need to have on is our MacBook.

Or not even. We just get some traditional books, and a nice glass of something to go with them, and we’re good for hours.

It does make us appreciate the pleasures of reading even more than we already did.

And that’s just the first 10 people we heard from! We’d love to hear from you too. Show us how you’re spending your quarantine time, whether it’s sheltering at home or seizing the chance to be naked outdoors in some quiet, unpopulated spot.

Email us at toplesspulpfiction@gmail.com or DM us on Insta.

We can’t be together — but you can join us all the same.

March 9, 2020.

With social distancing being enforced all over the U.S. — nowhere more so than in New York City — group events aren’t possible, and even just walking on the street is complicated.

But that doesn’t mean we can’t go outside, or enjoy the newly mild spring weather — or get out of our clothes, for that matter. It just means we need to be a little more inventive, and a little more careful.

Rooftops have always been a New Yorker’s best friend when it comes to outdoor nudity, and they’re your friend now. Go up on the roof and you’re in your own little world — quiet, private, secluded. Take off as little or as much as you want. Get the Vitamin D your body craves. Fight the stir-crazy that gets to all of us when we’re stuck inside for too long.

And sure, why not, get a photo or two to remember it by. Just ask your friend with the camera to stand at least 6 feet away.

One day this will all just be a memory. Our rooftop events will look this again, we promise:

And when that time comes, we hope you’ll join us.

But until then? We hope you find some comfort, some freedom, and some naked time out under the sun, even if it has to be all by yourself.

Who knew that, just a month later, Valentine’s Day would feel so far away? On February 14, none of us had heard of “social distancing.” Certainly no one was practicing it. And yet here we are, on March 16, and the world has changed.

Let’s take a look back at that lost world of a month ago. One of our members who is in training to become a licensed massage therapist had the lovely idea of celebrating Valentine’s Day by leading a session where she’d share her knowledge and we’d all get the chance to try out a variety of massage techniques.

Some folks came in pairs–

–while others paired up once they arrived.

And still others found their ways into trios.

We began with some demonstrations on eager volunteers…

…and then split up into our pairs and trios to try the moves out on each other. (Even a foursome or two.)

We worked on individual body parts: feet, glutes, pecs.

Were we masterful masseuses? Not after a single demonstration. What we were was game and open-minded and eager to learn.

And learn we did. We all emerged from this session better at massage and more appreciative of its benefits than we went in.

But what we didn’t appreciate then, and are only starting to now, is just how wonderful a thing simple human contact is. The contact of a group of warm, kind, like-minded individuals coming together for a common purpose. And also the very simple physical contact of your hands on another person’s body, her hands on yours.

That was February. Now it’s March, and we’re all trying hard not to breathe on each other. To stay 6 feet apart. To “hunker down” at home, alone.

But touch is so very precious.

So profoundly, deeply intimate.

We will all come to crave it over the coming months.

We are very grateful that we got to have such a lot of it on Valentine’s Day.

And we hope you will join us when it’s possible to have it again.